Content collaboration as a successful business model – Pierogi Dinner Study

20190124_192216
Men on a mission: 1200 klotchka cookies.

In the overall success of the internet, the ability of not-in-the-same-place talents to be immediately and easily incorporated into the creative flow ranks high, especially for those who are participating in the booming sector called ‘Remote work.’

Beyond the 24/7 foundering and obfuscation on display in Washington, communication should never be lacking with real world clients. Cell phones, laptops, Skype, time-task tracking software, of course, texting, are the norm and eminently useful.

Time zones? Pssshhh! California is always going to be three hours difference.  You signed up for that when you responded to the online Looking For.

Bringing resources together

With content creation, there’s always “The SEO People” who drill managers in must-have markers in getting material created. There’s always a director, a corporate or personal ‘voice’ is determined, ideation becomes a product through a process of submissions from sources tasked to websites, blogging, and media-click counts.

There isn’t a room full of Mad Men-style creatives down the hall any more. Whole operations are dedicated to the proposition of lots of people doing pieces, with a use ’em and lose ’em financial philosophy.

Anyway, the Pirogi Dinner Study. A community group I work with does several primarily eating events a year that maximizes our manpower. We also have an annual Christmas Tree Sale that starts the day after Thanksgiving. There are about 85-90 active members, across wide age groups, with most having a significant amount of professional expertise of one kind or another.

Last year, a member originally from Cleveland (Stephen Fogg), suggested a pierogi dinner as a late-January replacement for a less-well attended spaghetti dinner. His pitch was, “Every church in Cleveland does pierogi dinners in Lent, same with Pennsylvania, even New York. It’s relatively cheap, great family event, week before Super Bowl.”

Without any track history in Charlotte, NC on this particular Polish culinary item – a large, shredded cheese and potato-filled ravioli is the common description – the original goal was 450 paying customers. On the bottom line, it was an exceptional success; people started coming down the steps and into the cafeteria at 5:01, and it was 2 1/2 hours slamming time for our workers.

We served about 800, and not an unhappy camper in the lot. The planned dancing area wound up taking ten more tables instead. We have established a terrific foothold in a dynamic niche market. Our biggest problem might be handling any Year Two increase, a subject for another day perhaps.

The time logistic

The time logistic, from original idea presentation to a client (the club officers) to killer event as a scheduled, documented success was four months. The analogy of how its similar, and possibly even easier, to gain consensus with remote workers on any  creative projects is where I’m going. It’s the software, baby!

The director’s ideation was transmitted to the necessary work group months in advance of the post-Christmas event by an obvious product evaluation: he made the dinner, including slivered sauteed onions, kielbasa, and sauerkraut.  BIG success, everyone buys into the project, its recognized as comfort food from many of their early years.

Sound like where you’d want a project to be on the enthusiasm meter? Right, and the KPI people will be tracking enthusiasm.

The simplest idea became a driving force in the success. The project director’s knowledge and previous expertise (“every church in Cleveland”) was an A-1 asset, the group history in scaling up became an ‘all you can eat’ invitation in area church bulletins, and as noted, huge success on that communication front.

The product itself was exceptional, including 1200 kolacky (jelly filled-folded cookie). The notion of “too many chefs” in a creative kitchen as a negative still translates, you can only follow one strategy. Its still a fact, however many workers it takes, the product has to be there when scheduled-necessary.

There was a test-firing of the process a week prior to the event dinner, from outside cookers to grilling and adding trimmings, making the cookie dough with four mixers, the empirical A/B  more-most effective way to get desired outcomes deal techies always go on about. The steering committee understood how kitchen and service roles needed to be handled, including the facility prep, launch (5:01) and overall capabilities of volunteers.

The addition of secondary support people (middle/high school students doing service hours) ensured downstream reaction and course correction were highly linked. How many techies does it take to empty a *real* bin?

Its easy to see challenges like garbage removal from tables in any production directly in front of you, yet all the elements of a project are within a couple clicks and keystrokes of any content coordinating person. With today’s online collaboration possibilities, its simple for a project director to see any and all associated materials, to know what they want changed, and connect with any specific contractor about content.

20190125_162102
Few things are more satisfying than a project done well, with all the parts contributing as expected. Pierogis were hard core “content creation.”

 

One thought on “Content collaboration as a successful business model – Pierogi Dinner Study

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s