CBD oil as health care resource for Baby Boomers struck a useful chord early

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When searching for results, if you find a product that works, keep it around.

If you consider the early years of Boomers with Daniel Boone hats and hoola-hoop “fads,” CBD is more like Beatles-level important. The 70 million strong ‘Baby Boomer’ generation (1946-1964) will be overtaken by Millennials (1981-1996) soon, but Boomers accepted documentation and showed a personal willingness early to experience this non-drug and the many physical things it seemed to benefit without the buzz.

CBD oil became a health care star quickly in 2019, beginning with the passage of 2018 Farm Bill (Senate Bill 2667) just before the government shut down in December.  An essential change was redefining CBD as “all parts of the Cannabis sativa plant that do not exceed 0.3% delta-9 THC by dry weight, including “derivatives,” “extracts,” and “cannabinoids.”

Boomers are aware that Reefer Madness scare tactics and criminalized marijuana (Controlled Substances Act, 1971) use were bogus in a lot of ways, but few will deny the scary aspects of opioids like codeine, fentanyl, and hydrocodone addiction. That singular aspect makes CBD’s all-natural aspect even more appealing to those who have more liberal views on what may be good or bad for them.

With a market projected at $22 billion by 2022, Boomers can consider CBD kind of like Coca-Cola as the Real Thing.

Because they’re often caregivers, Boomers have significant first hand knowledge about upcoming senior care issues, including expensive medications with known, negative side effects. Their “Forever Young” group attitude has always valued health issues (racketball, jogging, aerobics) and their top priorities at sixty-plus years are now inflammation, pain management, and as a sleeping aid, areas where CBD has shown documented strength and results.

While it’s got a great reputation regarding arthritis inflammation, CBD is actively marketed for a plethora of medical concerns, like ADHD, multiple sclerosis, chronic pain, as a multi-vitamin, for blood pressure, hormone regulation, even PTSD. Most people don’t care whether indiscriminate use blurs previous medical boundaries, more an increased ability to control personal wellness programs being an easily followed path.

How does CBD affect the body?

In an absolute bottom line report from WHO (World Health Organization), they stated that “In humans, CBD exhibits no effects indicative of any abuse or dependence potential,” which is a positive, 180 degree alternative to the opioids addiction crisis.

While everyone knows they have a central nervous system (right?), you may not be cognizant of your endocannabinoid system (ECS), which is something that will be constantly referenced in everything you read about CBD. I’ll suggest this as a starting point to learn about its important physical regulatory roles.

Pain management, as a sleep aid, and anxiety are high priorities, and negatives like 60,000-plus deaths a year from opioids compared to essentially none to date for CBD oil is not just something you missed on the news.

Bioavailability

After a friend asked, “Whats the best way to take it?” I suggested sub-lingually, meaning under the tongue, because outside of vaping – which has taken a fairly harsh hit (sorry…) recently – that provides the greatest payoff with dosage.

Using a 25 mg capsule as a standard dose, swallowing the capsule or gummie means it has to go through the liver for processing, and only about 6% of that is “available” in the bloodstream when all is done. Vaping gets 50-60% of that 25 mg. sample (about 15 mg) into the blood stream because of the surface area the inhaled vape is exposed to in the lungs.

The mouth is a large mucous gland, and holding the tincture in there for even 30 seconds allows absorption of up to 40% (10 mg) bioavailability, even though swallowing it still means it goes through the liver.

Topicals are a simple and effective use of CBD. While very little of the rubbed on content gets absorbed into the blood system, the “magic” in the application is that its already where its needed. While a 750 mg. 4-oz. tube (ie- Recover) is mathematically 190 mgs. per ounce, “liberal application” for a knee or muscle strain is noticeably helpful without using anywhere near that amount.

Dosing is something that has to be figured out. There is no RDA (required daily allowance) for CBD, or any height-weight algorithm for mgs. There is also a caveat about CBD oil and drug interaction, specifically being a “competitive inhibitor” with the CYP450 (cytochrome) liver enzyme, which metabolizes 60-80% of the meds that Americans take.

The “dog in the manger” example works here: The CBD and CYP450 enzymes deactivate each other, so the CYP450 enzymes in your system doesn’t break down the meds and make them release the benefits they’re supposed to in a timely manner. The “dog” (CBD) can’t eat the hay in the manger, but it doesn’t let the “cow” (CYP450) get to it either.

If you’ve heard an older aunt or family friend complain about not being able to enjoy grapefruit from their tree because of an interference with medications, this is probably what they mean.

Stress relief, pain management

Doctors still don’t get much training with CBD or natural cures; in 2016, only 13 percent of U.S. medical school did any kind of training.

“Anxiety” is a consideration that ranks very high for users, and how the ECS receptors are turned on by CBD to mitigate this area is worth reading about. While there is a significant amount of anecdotal information about relief on many, many fronts, pain management may be crucial as a “Quality of Life” concern, because CBD “amps” efficacy of other meds, which when known, can help reduce dosage levels.

All the hoo-ha over infusion of CBD (not legal according to FDA), its status as a nutritional supplement, or whether Boomers are going to turn its ability to “chill” situations across a range of what historically required ‘real’ pharmaceuticals, is still in growth stage.

Like CBD’s well-known THC “brother from the sativa mother” though, if it works so nice, maybe try it twice.

That one, crucial, must-have piece that moves projects forward

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I might have thought I had problems with a camera, but Mike was the boss with heat all around him before Oyster Roast.

Before packing up the laptop  and sending it to Memphis over a camera not functioning – and recognizing I’m sometimes behind the curve tech-wise – there was recently a quantity of angst over getting a specific video off my phone and attached to a Google document that needed to be sent for a proposal.

After performing the operation three times myself – then tapping Librarian #1’s understanding for forty minutes – I’d expected a $99 visit with the Microsoft people would move things from “Does not recognize camera” error message to productive asset again. Being able to move forward because I stayed on the problem until it was resolved, that’s what I call my Matt Damon in “The Martian” moments.

Sweating further delay regarding that proposal made the relief of getting some necessary help a moment worth sharing with others. Anyone who has been on group calls where a certain person – with the element that everyone is gathered to learn about – is late, knows both the feelings of frustration and relief.

Your patience factor definitely counts

Trust me, people who have dealt with someone who gets frantic about a computer snafu and wants to make it *their* problem too, probably won’t be gracious by a third time around. That two different library workers tried their darnedest, and eventually found an effective option, is also a (small) credit to submerging my often squeaky wheel style.

Journalistically and as a content creator, my expectation is that equipment should do what its supposed to – I require a keyboard and access to information. Getting many, many things in-out of electronic media daily, even as a realtor, the message was always, “Make sure your technology works.” The least gratifying thing I hear when enterprising a solution is, “Well, that should’ve worked.”

While “should’ve worked” is an affirmation that my being stymied was perhaps appropriate, it still involves a dammit! because its a sticking point unhandled.

Searching for help works best without extra attitude. Bitching about the inconvenience to you isn’t going to motivate others to provide answers or assistance. Getting to the point is like using your Elevator Speech, or that first paragraph in any article – give potential helpers a reason to keep listening, or maybe point you in a right-er direction.

After a steady extra examination with Librarian #2, the BINGO! moment came with his suggestion to utilize YouTube to download the phone, and copy the link from that into my document instead of Google Pictures/video.

After three previous attempts, bam! that simple option-change was The Right Piece, with the focus on getting a crucial detail handled a very real result. No telling how things roll now that I’ll have to use library for a couple weeks because I don’t have a backup at home, but I’m not scared they’ll consider me a dummy for asking why my machine doesn’t work.

FYI – Backed up and packed up

Sending 99% of everything a potential client asks for with position descriptions might not even be enough, so paying attention to details counts. That video I wanted so bad? It was :58 because the gig description said “No longer than 1:00 video.”

Reviewing the proposal, and recognizing some notes for a social media element hadn’t been turned into specific post samples. While stating the importance of getting that one, crucial piece handled, its always a good idea to check the details one last time.

While this unit goes into the box right after this blog, its contents have been backed up. Tomorrow I’ll go back to that refurbished library in SouthPark and thank Ed again.

Oh yeah, saying Thanks! is still a simple courtesy that makes helpers happy. My tutoring in reading and writing keeps a positive attitude about sharing expertise to carry forward, so there’s no reason not to send that outward when you’ve gotten the necessary results.

This being a political blog aside, today is better than Recession or Kurds situation

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During the Recession, you didn’t sweat talking politics over the grill, we were all worried about the same things, and Trumpies hadn’t been invented.

Back in the early, terrible years of the Recession, I had several opportunities to have a cigar and some scotch with one of my brothers, the high caliber banking guy, while the Thanksgiving turkey was deep frying. He was an excellent person to bounce all the information I’d read and heard off, and I really felt smarter in other conversations after those talks.

If you weren’t trying to learn more then, all you could do was cower in fear that the Economics Gods didn’t body slam you any worse. Between a job I disliked and Trumpies though, I admit the below-my- abilities job was easier to deal with.

There wasn’t any difficulty about the facts of what we were going through then, and those who had jobs were mostly just a little happier than those on – or over – the hairy edge. Neither side was about Good or Bad, we were all struggling. There was an expectation that our government had its hand on the tiller, and nobody was seriously being dissed or crushed just because of their economic situation or heritage.

Sure, people abandoned pricey homes and took lifestyle hits while reducing ten days in an exotic locale to “stay-cations,” taking kids out of private schools with $20,000 a year tabs, holding on to cars “until things get settled a little better,” and not automatically going out to dinner three times a week.

Things aren’t anything like that now

Yes, the world seems stuck on the politics of things in 2019, and if the choices are “Love him or hate him,” LOTS of people – including me – are on the latter side of that with Trump.

Take an analogy of the high school bully-cretin who knocked the books out of your hands every time he saw you. Bet you didn’t think, “But he’s a helluva player when he’s on the court!”

Hell no. The aggravation and humiliation of having to pick up your stuff while others mogged along, maybe kicking your books, trying to get to their class in another wing of the school an over-arching consideration. You probably said, “Yeah, 23 points a game, but he’s still a d**khead” to your buddy.

You might keep your mouth shut after a buzzer-beater against an arch-rival, but day to day, he was a blot on almost any happiness you could imagine being in the same school could bring. No sense telling the cute girl in biology class your opinion, her friend was dating the guy, and Cutie was probably jealous of that.

What has that got to do with any concerns we have about education, immigration, the national debt, torquing the relatively naive President of the Ukraine, or shafting Kurdish allies in Syria in the most obvious and life-threatening way?

Expectations of what America stands for

Unlike back in those dark economic times, you didn’t stop caring about how the people down the street were doing. You didn’t walk away from them, muttering about their character because they rooted for the “wrong” team. It was legitimate to think they weren’t too smart to be a Browns fan, yet poking fun at stuff like that wasn’t taken to the Nth degree of thinking thugs from ICE should haul them away.

The question of “What happens after…?” is just as real today as during the Recession years. Yes, impeachment proceedings are going to tear this country up, but like we *knew* back then, the Biblical “This too shall pass” was something to believe in. As I told an Italian lady I tutored, this is still shy of the heart-breaking nastiness that Vietnam was for Americans, mostly because LOTS of (young) people died in those times.

When *every*single*person* that came into the current Administration was placed in a role that gave them the ability to sink an institution they HATED – and it seems many are face-first in the public trough – that sucks though. I often use DeVos – whose “expertise” for Education ends with her $1 million donation to Trump campaign – with her desire to kill public education funds, and Pruitt, the grifter from Oklahoma who opened the sewage gates wide on the environment, as examples. It was depressing to think the next day meant another humiliation, having their books (figuratively) slapped out of their hands, for that piece of America under their boots.

So now there appears to be light in the tunnel that ISN’T another damn train. While not the final word on things many, many, many don’t like – including former allies around the world who think badly of US actions – “we” don’t have to just take it. Walking the other way instead of trying to discuss ANY situation with a Trumpie doesn’t bring any real sense of calm, just that we can see *something* is finally being done that might change this long sled ride towards the bottom of the American soul.

Mostly I write about business, although some of the sports pieces have a lesson to them. Am I doing better than during Recession? Well, yeah, but how much of any piece of anything else in 2019 am I happier about, that seems a valid criteria to judge life on.

Hmmm… That knee replacement (God bless the ACA) at end of 2017 changed life pretty dramatically, I don’t have to skip across the street to avoid getting run over. It’s (finally, after 50 days) raining in Charlotte today, nothing wrong with that. I have a meeting about a next ‘gig,’ using my God-given ability as a “content creation person,” at about twice the $$$ I was making in retail back then is good, as is not being homeless in this rain.

And yes, knowing some real angst is is on the horizon for Trump and his enablers in Congress  – and even the schlubs for voted for him and think he’s doing a great job will have to stay quiet – is okay by me.

A cigar and some scotch at Thanksgiving, I’m looking forward to that. Doubt that we’ll be talking politics much though, and there’s nothing wrong with leaving that behind. That brother’s knowledge was superior about negative economics then, but knowing at least *something* is working towards Better Days, 2020 seems like sunshine in America time.

Panthers ‘D’ gets revenge on Bucs with five INTs, 7 sacks on Winston in London

Yes, it was an early start to day watching game from London (9:30), but sometimes ya gotta go with the flow.

Sports often provide a ready supply of analogies for the real world, and the idea that EFFORT increases the potential for desirable results is right at the top. The Panthers star running back, Christian McCaffrey (‘The Weapon called Cee-Mack’), put that in CAPS with his 22 rushes for a paltry 31 yards in their 37-26 win, especially his try, try, 3rd time successful 1-yard TD run to start the scoring as the Panthers moved to 4-2 on the season.

Several other aspects of the Panthers game were noteworthy, but you won’t find any negative commentary regarding Tampa Bay QB Jameis Winston’s 400 yards passing (30/54, 1 TD) just a week after Jacksonville’s Gardner Minshaw II went for a 373 yards, 2 TD game. All those numbers sound pretty high for a good reason, but the reality is, when you’re way behind on the scoreboard, things like that happen. Nobody in Charlotte is worried about Jameis slinging it all over Tottenham Hotspur Stadium in London when the defense hung up a five interception-two fumble-seven sack WIN! overall.

To provide some context to the Panther efforts, McCaffrey got essentially nothing from two yards out on the last play of a Week 2 loss at home to Tampa Bay. Given the opportunity to rectify that situation, being denied again wasn’t going to happen.

Credit Coach Ron Rivera for putting faith in his offensive line’s ability to punch it in, and for only allowing two sacks of Kyle Allen (20/32, 227 yds., 2 TDs, still no interceptions), even if they couldn’t change the Bucs focus on McCaffrey.

All the top receivers got to eat Sunday – DJ Moore (7/73 yds.), Greg Olsen (4/52 yds.). Curtis Samuel (4/70 yds., 2 TDs, and a terrific catch where he took the ball away from a pasted-on him defender, and an eight yard end around) has become the super-speed threat Panthers expected when they drafted him out of Ohio State.

As for the Panthers’ hellish afternoon for Winston, in 2018 they only registered 30 sacks, and they’ve had 24 in the last four games. That’s what you call ferocious, and it looked like everyone was shot out of cannons on every snap. Nobody in the organization really panicked after that sub-par season by the defense, and several players who didn’t really contribute last year are now showing their value, with a shout out to James Bradberry, who had ten solo tackles.

EFFORT isn’t just a coach’s wish      Image result for nfl, free pictures of carolina panthers, 2019

EFFORT isn’t just a coach’s wish, it’s a demand and necessity for everyone everywhere if you expect to be considered a winner, or even deserve playing time.

I recall a retail manager who always kidded me with the question, “Sure he/they are fast and tough, but can he/they get a credit card application?” at times like this. I certainly wouldn’t sweat that latter part much regarding the Panthers efforts, and we’ll see how things work after the bye week, when Panthers will travel to (currently) unbeaten San Francisco. Cam Newton might be ready to show what effort means to him in regaining his starters job.

Recruiter read ‘tech writing’ experience as intended, but wrong on client needs

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I recently had three very different chances to interface with recruiters regarding the same possibility with a major Charlotte bank, in this case, for technical writers. While  that’s generically “a club in my bag,” it didn’t get much play until I added a resume on DICE site.

Basic point: Know which sites work best for your skill set and goals.

Two people, who supposedly know how certain skills may fit with work orders, told me Monster and Careerbuilder were places they found most of their placements and possibilities. I’ve never liked those chronologically-oriented sites, and there have been plenty of possibilities on LinkedIn and FlexJobs, including remote options. 

KEYWORDS – BIG DIFFERENCE

It’s worth noting that early searching for ‘Writer’ roles on LinkedIn often produced more Underwriter and Service writer possibilities than creative positions. Putting ‘content creation’ in the keyword box, that went from barely a handful to nearly 100, and often included marketing and editorial managers. Knowing more than one way to look for things is a legitimate piece of any search effort.

Non-negotiable factors like moving still allow frequent opportunities to contribute from a laptop – good content can be created any time or place.

This up close and personal situation reinforced operational negatives I’ve held for a long time about recruiters, but also led to an affirmation of  opinions about whether current “talent gaps” could be mitigated if finders of people for positions did a better job of interviewing.

In two of these calls, I admit first contact appointment-getters – with fairly heavy, difficult to understand accents – were a consideration. Repeatedly asking them to slow down, and yes, thinking scams often flourish with confusion, I was on guard. There are dialer-operations that turn over leads that fill client schedules, and we’re all aware that “others” are constantly phishing for data.

I fixed my attitude about totally different groups of people contacting me – because “I saw your resume…” isn’t actually out of the blue, I am out there – just in time.

Key in recruiters getting what they need

One caller was totally in left field, because he was trying to work with an online resume from 2015 (Careerbuilder). Trying to steer him to more current information like LinkedIn seemed futile. Trying to explain a 2015 post-Recession in retail resume, which  represented nothing  I was trying to accomplish in 2019 – just, no. Thinking I could turn that option into even a 3-month contract wasn’t a reality.

I admit being less nice to him, but fixing my attitude about different groups of people contacting me out of the blue with “I saw your resume…” came through just in time. 

Talking with Recruiter #2, the ‘take over’ local (Charlotte) person I’d scheduled a call with left me far far less confident about success compared to the CBD company I connected with through LinkedIn right after New Years. Maybe he was describing a totally different job – I found out a month later he was actually right on about a situation that sounded far above my comfort level regarding previous technical expertise.

There’s a definite difference in needing-to-be-done-a-certain-way design for multiple layers of starting from scratch tech writing vs. compilation and interpretation of content and “editorial values.”

Recruiter #3 was Goldilocks – just right – a pro out of Philly who interpreted my resume exactly the way I wrote it, and expect it to be read.

#3 had a WHOLE different POV on my matching the client’s  web/content management needs, not what I seemed to lack with #2. Don’t burn bridges with recruiters. Having an above average and realistic interview is still the goal of responding to online-available descriptions. 

He indicated there would be a training period, so that contract people were trained in Open Text, and picking up something on gigs becomes career enhancing expertise for content people. I haven’t been intimidated about using systems listed in job descriptions, and glad to know about up front training, which is nothing but good business.

Recruiter Guy #3 was prepared

He’d seen my LinkedIn profile, knew about my real estate, and made a suggestion about amping the job titles regarding tech writing for two specific jobs. He liked the continuity of  ‘2000 to Current’ – and frankly, side hustle business doesn’t have to pay all the bills to go on your CV.  When its relevant, make sure its known. You’ll rarely get asked about things people don’t know are possibilities.

  • Customer ordering and return procedures, written for “guys in the pits” v. front office personnel, regarding industrial laundry equipment.
  • Editing and formatting of 65 page Monthly Management Report – from 17 contributors.
  • After Hours Care ‘cheat sheet’ of weekend staff procedures

CDTalent Enterprises has produced in a variety of situations that create editorial depth.

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This is an upgraded kronut by Sugarrmann, with an extra blob of flavorful lemon under the glazing, after I reviewed a previous version’s tastefulness.  I’m not a coder.

I appreciated speaking 40 minutes vs. ten – If you’ve gotten jaded hearing about recruiters and eight seconds checking a resume, getting to phone calls is actually the goal. You don’t WIN! because someone responded, and IMHO, getting the right kind of help by better communicating your expertise is its own reward.

As a gig, we’ll see about phone interviews next week, but part of my work system is to keep the professional options hopper productive. While its proof nothing goes away on the Internet AND what it can deliver as results, I’m elementally glad my opinions about how much better recruiters could do with interviewing turned out to be right.

McCaffrey goes long on 84-yarder v. Jags, Panthers defense stops hot Minshaw at end

This is the same view Jaguars got of C-MC (cee-mack) on Panthers team record 84-yard run. Even Mr. Modesty checked himself on the big scoreboard.

While my keyboard time usually involves more content creation and long-form informational blogging recently, I’m still a sportswriter-fan who is thrilled at how the local Panthers are handling matters. Quarterback Kyle Allen has gone 3-0 since Cam Newton’s foot injury turned out to be more of a real problem, and the 34-27 win over Jacksonville was nothing but positive on many fronts.

Hey, you all had the TV on by the time McCaffrey flipped over two Jacksonville defenders into the end zone for a TD at the end of Panthers first drive, right? And you *KNEW* the linebacker who wound up on him in the slot was toast as soon as McCaffrey planted to cut inside, and scored on an 18-yard reception, right?

On an afternoon when McCaffrey crushed the concept of running back (‘weapon’ works, might be un-PC though), and looked *Good!* holding his form all the way on an 84-yard lightening bolt  run – even Mr. Modesty looked at the big board – it was a gratifying, all around good team win.

At some point in the future, the Panthers are going to want to put a statue of Christian McCaffrey on the stadium grounds, just don’t expect him to pose for it.  Clearly not the man’s style, although he’s the High Achiever type, and recognition comes with that.

Along that line, congratulations to the four gentlemen inducted into the Hall of Honor: Tight end Wesley Walls,  offensive tackle Jordon Gross, the quarterback that took the Panthers to their first Super Bowl, Jake Delhomme, and the epitome of effort,  wide receiver Steve Smith, Sr.

Smaller congrats to Coach Ron Rivera, whose 74 victories with the Panthers makes him the franchise’s winning-est coach.

Charlotte fans still in the upper decks to witness it

Without getting wild ‘n crazy over 3-2, it was a satisfying victory over the Jaguars, who came into the NFL in 1995, same as the Panthers. Watching the entire game, on an optimal Carolina afternoon without massive heat, the Panthers always seemed to be in control, although Jag QB Gardner Minchaw II and a couple other Jags had pretty strong days too.

If you appreciate what Kyle Allen has done in managing the team to three victories, imagine how they feel in Jacksonville with Nick Foles going down. Minchaw hung a 26/34 (76%), 374 yards, two touchdown day on the board against what had been Panthers #1 ranked defense against the pass (Panthers had two sacks). He also hit DJ Chark (8/164 yards, 2 TD) for three gainers of over 30 yards, had six scrambles for 66 yards, and there was still a possibility – because Joey Slye missed a PAT – for the Jaguars until the chaos of three ‘final’ plays.

Kuechly batting the ball down was the end of a long afternoon for the Panthers, although I’d be willing to acknowledge Minchaw’s pyrotechnics on his ability to evade a strong pass rush than any lack of effort up front.

On that item, I’m willing to forget 2018, when Eric Washington’s front seven simply didn’t get to QBs, and the defense was repeatedly torched along the way. The rush had an excellent game against the Texans Deshaun Watson (which he took out on Atlanta 53-32). Rookie LB Brian Burns had an outstanding strip-sack/touchdown run Sunday, and Ross Cockrell, who didn’t play last year after a broken leg in training camp, is showing up regularly (6 tackles) in the secondary.

Let’s admit that McCaffrey’s shot-from-a-cannon 84-yarder looked faster for longer than Fornette’s 49-yarder, but seeing Fornette outrun Luke Keuchly’s angle to the edge and then motor away, that’s what 4.4 speed looks like. For those who still worry about Cee-Mack getting worn out/overused, the way he grinds out 3-4 yard carries is why those extra ten pounds of muscle this year count, and he sure didn’t LOOK any slower, did he?

Olsen didn’t draw any throws, and that’s never really acceptable in my book. Olsen has always been a favorite receiver for Newton, and Allen did find him twice in that first four touchdown game though. The best explanation is that Olsen is part of that core leadership (Thomas Davis out, Gerald McCoy in) the Panthers benefit from. He’s all about TEAM, and if extra blocking against the Jags pretty good defensive rush was necessary to keep #7 clean, he knows his number isn’t being called for a reason.

It has never seemed like without Newton all was lost, like last year.

This coming Sunday the Panthers play the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in London, UK, then have a bye week before going to San Francisco, with a chance to be 6-2 again at mid-point of the season if they beat the Titans to begin November. A win vs. Bucs might not seal them in cellar, because Atlanta isn’t doing so hot. The Saints? Ten wins? Newton ready after the bye?

“Believing” already isn’t how things roll in Charlotte

There have been up-down years in Charlotte, even two Super Bowl trips, but for 25 years as a franchise here in “The Buckle on the Bible Belt,” every good year has been followed by misery for the Panthers. There’s a collective holding back that only disappears at times like that Thanksgiving game against Dallas to go 11-0 in 2015. That’s when a lot of people voiced the same thing, about finally believing it was okay to think they could be THAT good.

I’m of the belief that this is 25th anniversary version is actually much better than the 2018 team, and not just pickin’ at hearts early and then going belly-up, like those seven losses in a row after 6-2 start.

The offensive line looks to be righteous – the Panthers had 285 yards rushing, and when your boy leads the league, that’s something to hang your hat on. Reggie Bonnafon’s five carries for 80 yards, including a 59-yard TD run, meant there was no need to bring McCaffrey back into the game after a minor injury in the 4th quarter.

Even if Allen has now been sacked just under three times a game, yes, eat the ball young man! (still 0 INTs this year).  507 yards of Jaguar’s offense aside, every aspect is MUCH better than Panthers 2018, certainly the pass rush has a restored sense of pride.

If the question comes up about what HASN’T McCaffrey done for this team, he doesn’t sell popcorn at halftime as they sometimes say, and he failed to convert a pair of short 4th down runs – one of which might have won the Bucs game.

Very few people will remember that, but for Mr. McCaffrey, that’s the extra bit of fire you might not see along with those great guns of his. Figuring out how much further to a 1,000-1,000 rushing/receiving season is legit.

What do Andy Neumann, Trump, you, and Sweltering Charlotteans Have in Common?

Year One, the year Panthers went to the Super Bowl. We'd waited out an ice storm before starting our string of successful oyster roasts, The HedgeHog concept: making $$$ is fine, the community event rocks, and the box burning is an official ending.
Year One, the year Panthers went to the Super Bowl. We’d waited out an ice storm before starting what’s become a string of successful oyster roasts with 2500 oysters – this year its 7000. The HedgeHog concept: Making $$$ is fine, the community event rocks, and the box burning is an official ending.

Answer: Most of those didn’t blow up a $47 billion IPO valuation, get tagged with “nonsensical” about real estate economics, or get kicked to the ”CEO No-longer” curb. Yeah, it sounds a bit snarky, but the razz-berries started early on WeWorks IPO.

The old expression – just ask Biden -“Three on a match” was a tribute to South African Boer (Dutch) farmers accuracy as snipers at the beginning of the last century. It might be elementally bad luck for the last one when English soldiers tried lighting three cigarettes to conserve scarce matches. Neumann walked into that analogy last week, covered in Silly String.

Investors have been memorably slapped silly with Theranos (diabetic testing, aloof and combative executive) and Lyft (yet to make a profit, plenty of corporate drama) as essentially empty bags, and Neumann’s WeWork’s IPO represented, well, “creative content” way beyond my pay grade. With regular mentions in the press about tequila-fueled days, pot smoking on the corporate jet, self-dealing over a corporate trademark, and then submitting shoddy SEC paperwork – that never offered a timeline for the company to turn a profit – failing economic sniff tests made him a stupendous third, bigly.

Personally, from a series of sweaty 4-on-4s at regular Monday night hoops, through about 35 minutes of shooting in 91 degree Charlotte humidity on Saturday, last week involved a lot of real physical heat. It’s just a fact here, 78 days of 90-plus this year (34 is the average), with expectations for more of the same coming. Sunday it was 96 – so while semi-lazy by only doing a pair of videos for proposals – and ballin’-out with a couple cold ones, watching local Panthers play excellent at all levels again, Slye blasted one 55-yards! – here’s betting it was a qualitatively better day than those other guys had.

Neumann and Trump – the Prez, obviously, with an official House impeachment investigation – is experiencing HEAT at a whooooole ‘nother level.

Neumann, who has burned through many SoftBank BILLIONS with WeWork’s concept of premium office rental space – obviously never read or considered leadership thoughts from Jim Collins iconic management book, ‘GOOD TO GREAT.’ Top three reasons that seems true, in no particular order: (not) Facing the brutal facts (of economics), “(not) Getting the right people (lots of relatives though!) on the bus, in the right places,” and ultimately, not deciding on a HedgeHog Concept to work from.

Before finally taking the HedgeHog Concept – doing one thing particularly well, being the best at it – to be the heart of a leadership thought, the bus analogy held a lot of early consideration in my weekend blog writing. There’s no doubt such references will be used soon though, since who’s on, still in, driving, or under any buses in the next week or so in that other “nonsensical” (political) world is going to be worth watching. “Right this way Mr. Guliani; Yessir Mr. Secretary, that seat is definitely meant for you.”

IT WAS EASY TO SEE, RIGHT NOW, IN BLACK AND WHITE

‘Good to Great’ is only 210 pages long (plus appendixes) and Collins labeling of traits and consistencies that statistically created Greatness are often esoteric – which as a management theory staple, such books rarely flow – always makes it incredibly readable. My CDTalent Enterprises business features content creation and community-level projects, and the Hedgehog definition hits a legitimate chord:

To simplify a complex world into a single organizing idea, a basic principle or concept that unifies and guides everything.

Content creation is way not the same as “sound bite” or Tweets, and right now my tone is set for “Leadership Thought.” Those two video projects last weekend – one involves marketing of the legal community – and Leadership Thought (LT) is an arena where ongoing experience in creating a ‘voice’ counts. Although I’ve done that ghosting route before, it could still be a next challenge for wordsmithing.

A Unifying Concept

HedgeHog-wise, CDTalent Enterprises’ unifying concept includes a half-dozen topics I have specific expertise about (including CBD), and proposals for articles is an easily achieved expansion – it already earned a three hour schedule block on Tuesday. That concept allows for nailing down an 8,000 words (with synopsis) book proposal before Thanksgiving, which I have a running start on.

The difference between not actually wishing someone dead, but being glad about the opportunity to read their obituary, is a Mark Twain-ism worth stealing.

Trump’s week was warmly spotlighted politically by Speaker Pelosi on Tuesday, even if  his blowing off a major environmental session at the UN gained a hairy eyeball look from 16-year old super-activist Greta Thurnberg of Sweden.  He wasn’t the guy *I* would want to take handshake pictures with, and his address at the United Nations wasn’t actually newsworthy.

Really, after announcing an impeachment inquiry at what approximated a national level by Pelosi, and setting real, fast-moving Congressional goals, I still wonder how much of the country ie.- FOXers -would know whether Trump spent time at the UN or played golf.

The Twain theory of obit reading seems in line with postmortem sympathy for a crispy ‘baked’ (nyuk nyuk) Adam Neumann, and Trump’s people are really not looking forward to “some grilling time” after vacation. Having three proposals generate additional interest would still make this coming week ‘hot’ on content as business front, but bet on fact us sweltering Charlotteans are waiting to smell what Congress might be cooking over the next couple weeks.

Hey, that’s a good hook for my Oyster Roast on October 19th!