Recruiter read ‘tech writing’ experience as intended, but wrong on client needs

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I recently had three very different chances to interface with recruiters regarding the same possibility, in this case, for technical writers. While  that’s generically “a club in my bag,” it didn’t get much play until I added a resume on DICE site.

So, Basic point: Know which sites work best for your skill set and goals as freelancer/copywriting resource.

Two people, who supposedly know how certain skills may fit with work orders, told me Monster and Careerbuilder were places they found most of their placements and possibilities. I’ve never liked those chronologically-oriented sites, and there have been plenty of possibilities on LinkedIn and FlexJobs, including top of my list consideration, remote options. 

KEYWORDS – BIG DIFFERENCE

It’s worth noting that early searching for ‘Writer’ roles on LinkedIn often produced more Underwriter and Service writer possibilities than creative positions. Putting ‘content creation’ and ‘writing’ vs. writer in the keyword box, that went from barely a handful to nearly 100, and often included marketing and editorial managers. Knowing more than one way to look for things is a legitimate piece of any search effort.

Another phrase that bears examining is ACHIEVEMENT as part of Administrative/Executive Associate submissions, but I’ll save that for another day.

It’s been proven throughout this pandemic, when working remotely quickly became a negotiable factor. There are frequent online opportunities to contribute from a laptop – good content can be created any time or place.

I’ve held certain opinions about recruiters, but the constancy of online searching  leads to the continued  opinion about whether current “talent gaps” could be mitigated if finders of people for positions did a better job of interviewing.

Admitting first contact appointment-getters – with fairly heavy, difficult to understand accents – threw me a little is true. Repeatedly asking callers to slow down, and yes, thinking scams often flourish with confusion, being on guard is a legitimate state. We’re all aware that “others” are constantly phishing for data.

I admit being less nice to him, but fixing my attitude about different groups of people contacting me out of the blue with “I saw your resume…” came through just in time. 

Key in recruiters getting what they need

One caller was totally from left field, because he was trying to work with an online resume from 2015 (Careerbuilder). Trying to steer him to more current information like LinkedIn seemed futile. Trying to explain a 2015 post-Recession in retail resume, which  represented nothing  I was trying to accomplish now – just, no. Thinking I could turn that option into even a 3-month contract wasn’t a reality.

Talking with Recruiter #2, the ‘take over’ local (Charlotte) person I’d scheduled a call with, left me far far less confident about success, compared to the CBD company I connected with through LinkedIn right after New Years. Maybe he was describing a totally different job, which it turns out he was, compared to Recruiter #3.  I found out a month later #2 was actually right on about a situation that sounded far above my comfort level regarding previous technical expertise.

There’s a definite difference in needing-to-be-done-a-certain-way design, info for multiple layers of starting-from-scratch technically sound, subject matter expertise  writing vs. something closer to compilation and interpretation of content and “editorial values,” and again, I’m not a coder. Continue reading “Recruiter read ‘tech writing’ experience as intended, but wrong on client needs”

Content creation, client needs are close to dating – better info turns into ‘righter’ decisions

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Typical selfie in bathroom mirror doesn’t move the needle much.

Certainly, online dating and sending RFP-level material to potential clients is a legitimate analogy. Wanting a good professional or emotional connection, one that satisfies a recognized need, works best when everyone is honestly trying on the information front.

Three specific examples of “finding the other”  involves a high, low, and medium set of informational points, and how it affects the successful matching up of elements desired by both parties.

On the low end would be a personal ad lacking any imagination or effort – one picture (the bathroom selfie), minimal written, or “If you want to know more, ask” slackery. That’s an unsatisfying combination from among hundreds of other possibilities, and its headed for the Out Bin almost as a reflex, right?

Content creation types understand that every CV or cover letter sent involves a judgment of our writing skills.

On a lovely, cool Monday morning, I declare that The Super High end of information is represented by 2 1/2 pages of printed who, what, why, how? relative to one recent company’s Content Marketing position. A statement of their corporate positioning, an introduction to expectations of a new team member, responsibilities, necessary skill set, personal qualities (hmmm…humility?), and finished up with bullet points about extras in the compensation situation you’d probably want to know about.

Almost without question – whether pursuing dates or a potential client – you’d invest more effort in something A-B-C, 1-2-3 clear about extra details to start. From the content creator side, responding to that well-defined description with an equally well-defined reason to investigate further is fundamentally right.

The best middle ground is a ‘date’ that shows up as a 100% as advertised stud or stud-ette.  Great attitude, desired attributes sharp and obvious, articulate enough during the meet-greet time over coffee or a cold beverage raising expectations of a possible match. If all is in tune a couple hours later – post-concert and a snack perhaps – its much easier to discuss what Next might look like.

What needs to be done when the bell is rung

Many of us like to think we’re the middle group professionally, that it’s just a matter of getting in front of a decision maker. Perhaps we lack an attribute or two software-wise,  or depth of expertise required, but if there’s not an organic height requirement, face-to-face will win the day.

Uhh-huh.

That would be amazingly naive of the one picture profile to think, and just as unproductive for a content creator candidate to ignore the relative clues in a well-written description of  how to impress that ‘date’ appropriately. 

That Super High end information provider is a remote location possibility vs. office situation, as definite a positive as a bright smile from across the room. The role responsibilities call for a versatile style across several channels (bingo!), engaging with subject matter experts (sales career and all previous freelance writing featured interviewing as a strength), and some esoteric pieces, like “the gumption to wrestle with a problem until a thought-through solution is achieved,” and “…abiding love for processing a lot of input, (then) fishing out the interesting and relevant bits.”

Immediate, verifiable info regarding  candidate

That meeting my date Saturday provided immediate, verifiable intell regarding an All That candidate doesn’t happen often. She was interesting, attractive, way better than just fit, a look-you-in-the-eye type with a compelling story about spirituality (including tarot, the hook in my books) that kept conversation flowing, and OMG! who wanted to go ‘dutch’ from the get-go.

Having seen the up-close reality of the option, it would be terrific if there was more to discuss in the near future. Hold onto that thought, because that real meeting of the people v. minds included almost two weeks of texting, and both of us had multiple pictures and profile writing.  Elementally, the dating system worked, and leaving out that information makes it sound like luck.

Never let it be thought you only did the least that could be done. Quality communications don’t need to be all-revealing bikini shots of one’s career, just promote the belief that we as responders might be that terrific person you’ll want to discuss a future relationship with.

All positive responses constitute a successful ‘first date’ for a content creation person.